17 Goals to Transform Our World

The Sustainable Development Goals are a call for action by all countries – poor, rich and middle-income – to promote prosperity while protecting the planet. They recognize that ending poverty must go hand-in-hand with strategies that build economic growth and address a range of social needs including education, health, social protection, and job opportunities, while tackling climate change and environmental protection. More important than ever, the goals provide a critical framework for COVID-19 recovery.

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End poverty in all its forms everywhere

End poverty in all its forms everywhere

Globally, the number of people living in extreme poverty declined from 36 per cent in 1990 to 10 per cent in 2015. But the pace of change is decelerating and the COVID-19 crisis risks reversing decades of progress in the fight against poverty. New research published by the UNU World Institute for Development Economics Research warns that the economic fallout from the global pandemic could increase global poverty by as much as half a billion people, or 8% of the total human population. This would be the first time that poverty has increased globally in thirty years, since 1990.

More than 700 million people, or 10 per cent of the world population, still live in extreme poverty today, struggling to fulfil the most basic needs like health, education, and access to water and sanitation, to name a few. The majority of people living on less than $1.90 a day live in sub-Saharan Africa. Worldwide, the poverty rate in rural areas is 17.2 per cent—more than three times higher than in urban areas. 

For those who work, having a job does not guarantee a decent living. In fact, 8 per cent of employed workers and their families worldwide lived in extreme poverty in 2018. One out of five children live in extreme poverty. Ensuring social protection for all children and other vulnerable groups is critical to reduce poverty.

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KATOWICE CITY ACTIVITIES

Running day-care centres for children and adolescents to support families experiencing difficulties. The facilities provide the pupils with, among other things, two meals a day, learning assistance and the opportunity to participate in hobby clubs, excursions or cultural trips. In many cases, the scheduled activities help a child to avoid the so-called inherited poverty and learned helplessness.

Facts (2019):

171 children and teenagers have benefited from summer and winter recreation offers;

1410 people took advantage of the facilities offer;

The annual cost of managing and maintaining the centres amounts to PLN 5 659 981.

Community Centres and Local Activity Programmes to improve social functioning and strengthen the socio-professional potential of residents. They help to combat the disparities in the standard of residents’ living and support people who are excluded or at risk of exclusion. They also help people who return to the labour market, enabling them to acquire new or improve their existing qualifications. The centres operate in Nikiszowiec, Bogucice, Śródmieście, Wełnowiec-Józefowiec, Dębie, Zawodzie, Szopienice and Załęże.


An aid programme that promotes real estate tax exemption for persons engaged in non-profit activities for the benefit of vulnerable people.

Facts (2019): 21 entities benefited from the programme.

 

Zero Hunger

Zero Hunger

After decades of steady decline, the number of people who suffer from hunger – as measured by the prevalence of undernourishment – began to slowly increase again in 2015. Today, more than 820 million people regularly go to bed hungry, of whom about 135 million suffer from acute hunger largely due to man-made conflicts, climate change and economic downturns. The COVID-19 pandemic could now double that number, putting an additional 130 million people at risk of suffering acute hunger by the end of 2020, according to the World Food Programme. 

With more than a quarter of a billion people potentially at the brink of starvation, swift action needs to be taken to provide food and humanitarian relief to the most at-risk regions.

At the same time, a profound change of the global food and agriculture system is needed if we are to nourish the more than 820 million people who are hungry and the additional 2 billion people the world will have by 2050. Increasing agricultural productivity and sustainable food production are crucial to help alleviate the perils of hunger.

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KATOWICE CITY ACTIVITIES

A social store is an innovative solution, pioneer in Poland, whose main goal is to improve the economic conditions of people who have found themselves in a difficult life situation, resulting from unforeseen random events such as an epidemic, job loss, disability, their own or their loved ones' illness.
There will be a separate space for a club and cafeteria dedicated especially to Katowice seniors aged 60+, involved in various senior organisations.

As part of the Food Assistance Operational Programme, which has been implemented in Katowice for many years, there are three eateries and two food distribution points for the poor, homeless, unemployed and helpless. These points also undertake other activities, such as e.g. conducting workshops, and constantly cooperate with specialists in order to counteract negative social phenomena.

The eatery sharing food point is a place equipped with a refrigerator, where everyone can leave food that can be used by those in need. The intention of this project is that everyone, regardless of their life situation, can both share and use the gift of the table.

 

Good health and well-being

Good health and well-being

Ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being at all ages is essential to sustainable development. Currently, the world is facing a global health crisis unlike any other — COVID-19 is spreading human suffering, destabilizing the global economy and upending the lives of billions of people around the globe. 

Before the pandemic, major progress was made in improving the health of millions of people. Significant strides were made in increasing life expectancy and reducing some of the common killers associated with child and maternal mortality. But more efforts are needed to fully eradicate a wide range of diseases and address many different persistent and emerging health issues. By focusing on providing more efficient funding of health systems, improved sanitation and hygiene, and increased access to physicians, significant progress can be made in helping to save the lives of millions.

Health emergencies such as COVID-19 pose a global risk and have shown the critical need for preparedness. The United Nations Development Programme highlighted huge disparities in countries’ abilities to cope with and recover from the COVID-19 crisis. The pandemic provides a watershed moment for health emergency preparedness and for investment in critical 21st century public services.

KATOWICE CITY ACTIVITIES

Programmes aimed at senior citizens: “Active Senior” (a leisure time offer); “Grandma, Grandpa and Me in Katowice” (discounts for grandparents and grandchildren in municipal centres); “Złota Rączka” (Eng.: “Handyman” - free home improvement services, including minor repairs, etc.), the Katowice Senior Centre (27 Słowackiego Street).


The Municipal Public Library offers to residents aged 65 and more as well as disabled persons the possibility to borrow a book or an audiobook by phone or electronic means. The home delivery and collection of books, that were read, is free of charge.


"Katowice – a barrier free city" is a guide for people with disabilities, including their families and carers, helping them to contact appropriate authorities and institutions, and allowing them to plan their active leisure.


The “Migam” sign language interpreter enables people with hearing impairments to contact the Katowice City Hall through an on-line service available on their website.


The Community Self-help Homes provide services as part of individual or team self-help and social skills training, consisting in learning, developing or maintaining skills in everyday activities and functioning in social life.


Activation of the Centre for Non-Governmental Organisations and Volunteering (Polish: COP – Centrum Organizacji Pozarządowych: the branches at 14 Kopernika St. and 5 Młyńska St.) and appointment of a proxy for non-governmental organisations.

Facts (2019): 180 organisations benefited from various forms of COP support, 86 organisations have registered offices at 5 Młyńska Street or 14 Kopernika Street, 40 hours of advisory services per month, 933 rooms and equipment made available, 101 pieces of advice and mediation related to volunteering, 12 trainings, 19 meetings on volunteering, 8 industry meetings, 8 Active Gallery exhibitions.


Within the Health Prevention and Promotion Programme for the City of Katowice, there are implemented, among others, projects in the field of prevention of child caries, HPV infections, influenza or birth schools.

 
The three of us and more” programme offers large families discounts on access to swimming pools, courts, gyms, ice rinks and events organised by the City.

Facts: 23 492 cards have been issued since the programme began. 

There is observed an increase in the number of places in nurseries for children up to 3 years of age.

Facts (2019):

13 branches of the Municipal Nursery had 949 care places at their disposal,

34 non-public nurseries and 2 children's clubs with a total of 1407 places,

1154 care places in 30 non-public nurseries received a subsidy that reduced the cost of childcare provided by the nurseries for parents.

In addition…

Municipal swimming pools are being opened, where modern solutions (e.g. drowning detection systems or  photovoltaic systems) are applied. 

Parks are being revitalised.

And due to the COVID-19 epidemic, numerous protection packages for entrepreneurs, non-governmental organisations and cultural creators have been launched.

 

Quality education

Quality education

Education enables upward socioeconomic mobility and is a key to escaping poverty. Over the past decade, major progress was made towards increasing access to education and school enrollment rates at all levels, particularly for girls. Nevertheless, about 260 million children were still out of school in 2018 — nearly one fifth of the global population in that age group. And more than half of all children and adolescents worldwide are not meeting minimum proficiency standards in reading and mathematics. 
In 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic spread across the globe, a majority of countries announced the temporary closure of schools, impacting more than 91 per cent of students worldwide. By April 2020, close to 1.6 billion children and youth were out of school. And nearly 369 million children who rely on school meals needed to look to other sources for daily nutrition. 
Never before have so many children been out of school at the same time, disrupting learning and upending lives, especially the most vulnerable and marginalised. The global pandemic has far-reaching consequences that may jeopardize hard won gains made in improving global education.

 

KATOWICE CITY ACTIVITIES 

The P-TECH programme prepares young people for IT sector jobs. The pilot project is attended by the Complex of Technical and General Education Schools No. 2 in Katowice (cooperating with IBM Polska) and the Silesian Secondary School of Technology and Science from Katowice (cooperating with Fujitsu Technology Solutions).

 

Heart of the Metropolis – Katowice – My Place on Earth is an original programme of regional education, developed by a team of experts and implemented in Katowice schools.

 

The Reach for a Profession Festival is not only an opportunity to get acquainted with secondary school offers, but also a chance to talk to older friends and their teachers.

Facts (2020): 3 days, support from 4 ministries, 18 honorary patrons, 32 transmission hours, 133 workshops, 165 lectures, 215 demonstration stands, 330 speakers, 567 registered organised groups, 2200 exhibitors, 10 583 students participating in the Festival, 38 300 online broadcast audiences, over 51 000 ICC Festival participants.

 

Muzykodrom (Musicodrom), i.e. music workshops aimed at the youngest (from newborn babies to 9-year-olds), and other educational programmes of the Institution of Culture of Katowice – the City of Gardens (Plac Sejmu Śląskiego 2), where people play, sing, compose, experiment and listen. Facts (2019): 1 084 participants, 40 events.

 

Music School for Social Change is an international project in which Katowice is involved as a UNESCO creative city in the field of music. 500 students of three primary schools in Katowice were invited to cooperate. The city schools exchange good practices with other centres around the world. Facts: 60 hours of workshops on wind instruments, 24 concerts, more than 6.5 thousand participants of the project events.

Katowice was awarded the title of "Self-Government Education Leader" in recognition of achievements in the development of education and the educational system. A team of experts, consisting of scientists who represent selected Polish universities, appreciates the innovative solutions of cities in the field of education.

 

The Katowice Open City - Development of Social Services Project (stage II) aims to support 60 disabled and dependent people at risk of social exclusion, and to alleviate the problem of insufficient methodological support for a group of 20 carers of such people. Facts: the project value is PLN 1 032 600, the contribution from the European Social Fund is PLN 960 318.00.

 

The city is implementing the project entitled "Katowice as a City of Professionals", which is to encourage young people facing the choice of their further educational pathway in vocational and technical schools. The crucial phase of this project are study visits to companies participating in the enterprise, thanks to which students have the opportunity to learn about the working environment and its specificity. Facts: 31 schools are participating in the project; there have been conducted 52 study visits with a total number of over 1 100 students.

 

Gender equality

Gender equality

Gender equality is not only a fundamental human right, but a necessary foundation for a peaceful, prosperous and sustainable world. 

There has been progress over the last decades: More girls are going to school, fewer girls are forced into early marriage, more women are serving in parliament and positions of leadership, and laws are being reformed to advance gender equality. 

Despite these gains, many challenges remain: discriminatory laws and social norms remain pervasive, women continue to be underrepresented at all levels of political leadership, and 1 in 5 women and girls between the ages of 15 and 49 report experiencing physical or sexual violence by an intimate partner within a 12-month period.

The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic could reverse the limited progress that has been made on gender equality and women’s rights.  The coronavirus outbreak exacerbates existing inequalities for women and girls across every sphere – from health and the economy, to security and social protection. 

Women play a disproportionate role in responding to the virus, including as frontline healthcare workers and carers at home. Women’s unpaid care work has increased significantly as a result of school closures and the increased needs of older people. Women are also harder hit by the economic impacts of COVID-19, as they disproportionately work in insecure labour markets. Nearly 60 per cent of women work in the informal economy, which puts them at greater risk of falling into poverty. 

The pandemic has also led to a steep increase in violence against women and girls. With lockdown measures in place, many women are trapped at home with their abusers, struggling to access services that are suffering from cuts and restrictions. Emerging data shows that, since the outbreak of the pandemic, violence against women and girls – and particularly domestic violence – has intensified.

KATOWICE CITY ACTIVITIES

Guided by the idea of gender equality, the City of Katowice introduced its flagship jazz festival, i.e. Katowice JazzArt Festival - into the Keychange initiative, consisting in eliminating barriers faced by women in the music industry. The event, thus, became the first Polish music festival in which it was decided to achieve gender parity among the invited performers by 2022. In fact, this goal was accomplished already in the 2019 edition - out of 16 bands in the festival programme, 11 were created or co-created by female artists.

Social work with families affected by the problem of violence includes a wide range of specialist counselling services in various areas of life. The Municipal Social Welfare Centre provides shelter to people who, due to the dramatic situation, cannot stay in their current place of residence. There is a psycho-educational group for victims of violence, which helps to build up knowledge about protection and problem-solving opportunities, and provides legal, psychological and social support. There is also an Educational and Therapeutic Programme for people who have problems with anger, aggression and violence. As part of its tasks, the Municipal Social Welfare Centre cooperates with the Police Headquarters in Katowice as well as representatives of other services and institutions forming the Interdisciplinary Team for Family Violence Prevention.

 

Clean water and sanitation

Clean water and sanitation

While substantial progress has been made in increasing access to clean drinking water and sanitation, billions of people—mostly in rural areas—still lack these basic services. Worldwide, one in three people do not have access to safe drinking watertwo out of five people do not have a basic hand-washing facility with soap and water, and more than 673 million people still practice open defecation.

The COVID-19 pandemic has demonstrated the critical importance of sanitation, hygiene and adequate access to clean water for preventing and containing diseases. Hand hygiene saves lives. According to the World Health Organization, handwashing is one of the most effective actions you can take to reduce the spread of pathogens and prevent infections, including the COVID-19 virus. Yet billions of people still lack safe water sanitation, and funding is inadequate.

KATOWICE CITY ACTIVITIES

In Katowice, 13 storage reservoirs are being constructed to collect water for reuse, e.g. for watering city greenery, cleaning streets, squares and pavements. The first four tanks were built in 2019, in Piotrowice. The existing rain collector in Szopienice was adapted, as well. Natural water retention and adaptation of the rainwater drainage infrastructure serve to improve the water balance in urbanised areas. 

In 2019, the city launched the social campaign "Want a drink? - take a sip of Katowice tap water" (Silesian dialect:“Katowicka kranówka – szluknij sie z kokotka”). The City Hall gave an example, withdrawing water in plastic bottles and dispensers, and installing water fountains. Local businesses have been also involved in the campaign, including selected cafés and restaurants that serve free tap water.

The campaign is carried out in cooperation with the Katowice Waterworks Company. The element promoting drinking tap water was the original soda water machine, from which in the summer of 2019 you could drink water, also with juice, on the Market Square. According to the idea, the goal-oriented actions should “support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water resources management and sanitary infrastructure”. Therefore, the "Katowice tap water" campaign perfectly implements this idea, because in Poland about 60% of people do not believe that tap water can be drunk without negative health effects. By drinking tap water, we not only reduce the production of plastic, but we also realise what a luxury it is to have access to potable tap water, while so many people on earth suffer from its scarcity.

 

Affordable and clean energy

Affordable and clean energy

The world is making progress towards Goal 7, with encouraging signs that energy is becoming more sustainable and widely available. Access to electricity in poorer countries has begun to accelerate, energy efficiency continues to improve, and renewable energy is making impressive gains in the electricity sector. 

Nevertheless, more focused attention is needed to improve access to clean and safe cooking fuels and technologies for 3 billion people, to expand the use of renewable energy beyond the electricity sector, and to increase electrification in sub-Saharan Africa.

The Energy Progress Report provides global dashboard to register progress on energy access, energy efficiency and renewable energy. It assesses the progress made by each country on these three pillars and provides a snapshot of how far we are from achieving the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals targets.

KATOWICE CITY ACTIVITIES

Since the launch of the Municipal Energy Centre (2 Młyńska Street), 1902 personal pieces of advice were provided, 81 by e-mail and 514 by phone. Additionally, 536 people took part in the information and ecology meetings. In 2019, a series of 11 meetings, entitled "What are the eco-responsible ways to heat your home?", was held. The MEC fan pagefeatures 627 posts on the city's activities and information in the fields of air and climate protection, energy efficiency and environmental protection. In the future, it is planned to purchase a thermal imaging camera to take pictures of the facades of public and private buildings,  and to organise another series of meetings with residents entitled Black or Green Tea. 

Do you know how to obtain up to 80% of a targeted subsidy to replace your heating system with a more eco-friendly one? The City of Katowice provides funding for this purpose in order to reduce the emission of pollutants into the atmospheric air and improve the energy efficiency of private buildings.

Facts: 2011 - the replacement of 282 heat sources was co-financed for the total amount of PLN 1 501 576; 2019 - the replacement of 1 174 heat sources was subsidised for the amount of PLN 10 001 179; 2011 - 41 RES installations were co-funded for the sum of PLN 244 448; 2019 - 120 RESinstallations co-financed with the amount of PLN 712 411; an increase of subsidies for less affluent residents of Katowice from PLN 450 to PLN 900 for the fuel purchase.

                                                                                                                                                                                          As part of the "AWAIR" international project - Katowice, along with partners from other European cities, raised funds from the INTERREG CENTRAL EUROPE programme for the task of improving their air quality. It has been divided into short-term activities, undertaken when emission limits are exceeded, and those which aim to permanently reduce the level of pollution.

In selected locations (involving nurseries, kindergartens, orphanages, social welfare homes) 127 air pollution sensors and 154 result presentation screens were installed. The cost of the project is over EUR 290 000. In the nearest future, the system is planned to be extended to include indoor air quality monitoring in selected educational institutions.

 Katowice implements comprehensive e-mobility solutions to improve air quality. In 2019, 87 charging points (40 stations) were opened in the city, and at the beginning of 2020, the new ones were put into operation. They are situated in the city centre, next to the interchange stations, in the vicinity of the major public buildings, along the most important routes and close to the largest housing estates.

Along with the development of the car chargers network, the number of electric vehicles - both private ones as well as buses and cleaning vehicles - is increasing. Facts: The sum of PLN 500 000 was allocated by the City for the expansion of the electric chargers network.

Moreover...

Low-emission vehicles were purchased to supplement the city's fleet of public transport, the "30 km speed limit" zones were introduced in the districts, thermal modernisation of buildings owned by the city was conducted, and educational activities were undertaken (the European Sustainable Transport Week, the Katowice City Energy Days, the "Eco-Responsible" Family Forest Picnic).

 

Decent work and economic growth

Decent work and economic growth

Sustained and inclusive economic growth can drive progress, create decent jobs for all and improve living standards. 

COVID-19 has disrupted billions of lives and endangered the global economy. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) expects a global recession as bad as or worse than in 2009. As job losses escalate, the International Labor Organization estimates that nearly half of the global workforce is at risk of losing their livelihoods.

Even before the outbreak of COVID-19, one in five countries – home to billions of people living in poverty – were likely to see per capita incomes stagnate or decline in 2020. Now, the economic and financial shocks associated with COVID-19—such as disruptions to industrial production, falling commodity prices, financial market volatility, and rising insecurity—are derailing the already tepid economic growth and compounding heightened risks from other factors.

KATOWICE CITY ACTIVITIES

Good transport accessibility and large, modern facilities for the organisation of great events, the development of new technology and service companies, growing experience in the realisation of international large-scale events, as well as including business tourism in the administration list of the city development priorities are strong assets that attract business event organisers to Katowice.
Facts (2019): there were 6453 business events with 1 020 187 participants; their expenses amounted to nearly PLN 210 million; 22 hotels comprising 6 four-star ones.


The aim of the START IN BUSINESS (Polish: WySTARTuj w BIZNESIE) project is to develop entrepreneurship and self-employment among the residents through professional activation of people over 30 years old who are unemployed, employed on short-term contracts or working under civil law contracts. The project participants receive comprehensive support in the form of professional training for conducting an independent business activity, non-repayable start-up grants and bridge support (the basic and the extended one).


The "Your Path to Employment" project is focused on increasing the employability of people over 30 years of age, registered in the Poviat Labour Office as unemployed, in particular those belonging to one of the following groups: people over 50 years of age, women, the long-term unemployed, disabled and low-skilled people.


The Municipal Business Incubator Rawa.Ink, established in 2019, supports activities aimed at accelerating the development of a new economy based on technological innovations, inter alia, by creating attractive conditions for the development of entrepreneurship with particular emphasis on the sector of SMEs and start-ups. Rawa.Ink also builds a platform for cooperation between the local government, universities, business and the local community.


Additionally, participation in the International Business Incubator provides Katowice with new opportunities for the development of entrepreneurship by sharing good practices with other cities, involved in this project, or establishing new institutional and business relations. In the course of the cooperation, the project has evolved and was transformed into the Factory of Sustainable Development of Entrepreneurial Practices, where the objectives in the field of vocational training and social economy are also pursued.


Moreover…

The city provides one-time grants for starting up a business activity, together with the reimbursement of the costs of equipping or retrofitting a workplace.

 

Industry, innovation and infrastructure

Industry, innovation and infrastructure

Inclusive and sustainable industrialization, together with innovation and infrastructure, can unleash dynamic and competitive economic forces that generate employment and income. They play a key role in introducing and promoting new technologies, facilitating international trade and enabling the efficient use of resources. 

However, the world still has a long way to go to fully tap this potential. Least developed countries, in particular, need to accelerate the development of their manufacturing sector if they are to meet the 2030 target, and scale up investment in scientific research and innovation. 

Global manufacturing growth has been steadily declining, even before the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic is hitting manufacturing industries hard and causing disruptions in global value chains and the supply of products. 

Innovation and technological progress are key to finding lasting solutions to both economic and environmental challenges, such as increased resource and energy-efficiency. Globally, investment in research and development (R&D) as a proportion of GDP increased from 1.5 per cent in 2000 to 1.7 per cent in 2015 and remained almost unchanged in 2017, but was only less than 1 per cent  in developing regions.

In terms of communications infrastructure, more than half of the world’s population is now online and almost the entire world population lives in an area covered by a mobile network. It is estimated that in 2019, 96.5 per cent were covered by at least a 2G network.     

The coronavirus pandemic has revealed the urgent need for resilient infrastructure. The Asian Development Bank notes that critical infrastructure in the region remains far from adequate in many countries, despite the rapid economic growth and development the region has experienced over the past decade. The Economic and Social Survey of Asia and the Pacific highlights that making infrastructure resilient to disasters and climate change will require an additional investment of $434 billion per year. This sum may need to be even greater in some subregions, such as the Pacific small island developing states.     

KATOWICE CITY ACTIVITIES

Good transport accessibility and large, modern facilities for the organisation of great events, the development of new technology and service companies, growing experience in the realisation of international large-scale events, as well as including business tourism in the administration list of the city development priorities are strong assets that attract business event organisers to Katowice.
Facts (2019): there were 6453 business events with 1 020 187 participants; their expenses amounted to nearly PLN 210 million; 22 hotels comprising 6 four-star ones.

The aim of the START IN BUSINESS (Polish: WySTARTuj w BIZNESIE) project is to develop entrepreneurship and self-employment among the residents through professional activation of people over 30 years old who are unemployed, employed on short-term contracts or working under civil law contracts. The project participants receive comprehensive support in the form of professional training for conducting an independent business activity, non-repayable start-up grants and bridge support (the basic and the extended one).

The "Your Path to Employment" project is focused on increasing the employability of people over 30 years of age, registered in the Poviat Labour Office as unemployed, in particular those belonging to one of the following groups: people over 50 years of age, women, the long-term unemployed, disabled and low-skilled people.


The Municipal Business Incubator Rawa.Ink, established in 2019, supports activities aimed at accelerating the development of a new economy based on technological innovations, inter alia, by creating attractive conditions for the development of entrepreneurship with particular emphasis on the sector of SMEs and start-ups. Rawa.Ink also builds a platform for cooperation between the local government, universities, business and the local community.

Additionally, participation in the International Business Incubator provides Katowice with new opportunities for the development of entrepreneurship by sharing good practices with other cities, involved in this project, or establishing new institutional and business relations. In the course of the cooperation, the project has evolved and was transformed into the Factory of Sustainable Development of Entrepreneurial Practices, where the objectives in the field of vocational training and social economy are also pursued.

Moreover…

The city provides one-time grants for starting up a business activity, together with the reimbursement of the costs of equipping or retrofitting a workplace.

 

Reduced inequalities

Reduced inequalities

Reducing inequalities and ensuring no one is left behind are integral to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. 

Inequality within and among countries is a persistent cause for concern. Despite some positive signs toward reducing inequality in some dimensions, such as reducing relative income inequality in some countries and preferential trade status benefiting lower-income countries, inequality still persists.

COVID-19 has deepened existing inequalities, hitting the poorest and most vulnerable communities the hardest. It has put a spotlight on economic inequalities and fragile social safety nets that leave vulnerable communities to bear the brunt of the crisis.  At the same time, social, political and economic inequalities have amplified the impacts of the pandemic.

On the economic front, the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly increased global unemployment and dramatically slashed workers’ incomes.

COVID-19 also puts at risk the limited progress that has been made on gender equality and women’s rights over the past decades. Across every sphere, from health to the economy, security to social protection, the impacts of COVID-19 are exacerbated for women and girls simply by virtue of their sex.

Inequalities are also deepening for vulnerable populations in countries with weaker health systems and those facing existing humanitarian crises. Refugees and migrants, as well as indigenous peoples, older persons, people with disabilities and children are particularly at risk of being left behind. And hate speech targeting vulnerable groups is rising.

KATOWICE CITY ACTIVITIES

The Active Seniors programme provides support for Katowice seniors aged 60+, encouraging them to be more active and participate in social life through a number of discounts, granted by private entrepreneurs and units subordinate to the City.

Facts: From the beginning of the programme operation, i.e. between the years 2014-2019, almost 12.5 thousand cards were issued. In 2019 the City allocated over PLN 231 000 to the programme.

Another project, dedicated to residents aged 60+, is entitled ”Katowice Senior in the City”. Its aim is to prevent loneliness and marginalisation of the elderly people, especially by developing their skills and interests as well as organising pro-health, educational or sports activities.

Facts: In 2019, almost PLN 46 million was allocated to the programme. The programme cards were issued to 1996 persons; there are 6 senior citizens' clubs, 215 persons participate in their offer, 1096 persons use assistance centres (Social Welfare Centres, Family Centres of Social Care Services, sheltered housing), 24 projects implemented for seniors, 1434 persons take part in sports activities, 5059 persons take advantage of preventive programmes, 1080 persons benefited from the educational offer (University of the Third Age).

The City of Katowice provides transport services for people with disabilities. They are carried out not only in Katowice, but also in the neighbouring municipalities.

Facts: The number of people using the transport services in 2019 amounted to 3 117, including 758 people in wheelchairs for the disabled. The project costs for  the year 2019 are PLN 198 612. 

The three of Us and More project involves discounts for large families, including swimming pools, courts, gyms, ice rinks and events hosted by the City.

Facts:  23 492 cards have been issued since the programme began. There are 113 partners engaged in the programme, including invariably: 7 municipal entities operating in the field of culture and sport, and 106 institutions / private companies / sports clubs / social cooperatives. The costs for the year 2019 are PLN 61 394 31.

 

Sustainable cities and communities

Sustainable cities and communities

The world is becoming increasingly urbanized. Since 2007, more than half the world’s population has been living in cities, and that share is projected to rise to 60 per cent by 2030. 
Cities and metropolitan areas are powerhouses of economic growth—contributing about 60 per cent of global GDP. However, they also account for about 70 per cent of global carbon emissions and over 60 per cent of resource use. 
Rapid urbanization is resulting in a growing number of slum dwellers, inadequate and overburdened infrastructure and services (such as waste collection and water and sanitation systems, roads and transport), worsening air pollution and unplanned urban sprawl. 
The impact of COVID-19 will be most devastating in poor and densely populated urban areas, especially for the one billion people living in informal settlements and slums worldwide, where overcrowding also makes it difficult to follow recommended measures such as social distancing and self-isolation. 
The UN food agency, FAO, warned that hunger and fatalities could rise significantly in urban areas, without measures to ensure that poor and vulnerable residents have access to food.

KATOWICE CITY ACTIVITIES

Redevelopment of high risk road sections (including those of DK81 and DK86 national roads), which will smooth traffic flow in the city and make it safer for its users - both motorists and pedestrians.

Construction of interchanges in the districts of Ligota, Brynów and Zawodzie, allowing you to leave your car relatively close to the city centre - at the price of a public transport ticket - and travel by bus or tram.

Opening of the "Sądowa" international bus station in the city centre, which makes it possible to change trains, buses, trams or even bicycles.

In order to reduce traffic congestion, the Katowice Intelligent Transport Management System was implemented, due to which public transport vehicles have priority at crossings, and their users receive information about the arrival time of the expected bus displayed on the bus stop boards.

Using single track vehicles, not only for recreational purposes, is on the increase, therefore the cycling infrastructure - comprising cycling paths and bike rental stations - is constantly developed. Currently, there are 83 city bike docking stations in Katowice, where the residents have 666 vehicles  at their disposal. 

Transformation of Dworcowa and Tylna Mariacka Streets, thanks to which the car traffic in the city centre will be reduced, and the space - due to greenery and small infrastructure - will become more friendly to the inhabitants.

The KATOobywatel project is an invitation addressed to the residents to engage them in a number of actions, such as: planting trees, sowing flower meadows, cleaning the area around their homes together, and reporting the faults to be repaired in the city space. As part of this project, the first parklet in Katowice at Teatralna Street came into being and electric boxes were decorated with an artistic graffiti promoting the city modernist architecture. The project partners include, among others: non-governmental organisations, the municipal entities, local entrepreneurs and artists.

Katowice is investing in the renewal of existing green enclaves and the creation of new ones, involving residents in these activities. The latest tool, thanks to which the inhabitants can fulfil their needs related to ecology and environmental protection, is the Green Budget, under which it is possible to obtain funding for activities in this field.

Facts (2020): 128 applications were submitted, the pool amounts to PLN 3 million.


In order to popularise cultural resources, a digital form of selected museum objects, owned by the Museum of Katowice History, was made available online.

Every year, the city subsidises conservation, restoration and construction works of the most valuable monuments of Katowice.

The "Plac na Glanc" project activates residents to design, in cooperation with professionals, their backyard at the tenement house. The space is modernised with the use of the latest solutions and trends in design, as well as ecological ideas and recycling methods.

 

Responsible consumption and production

Responsible consumption and production

Worldwide consumption and production — a driving force of the global economy — rest on the use of the natural environment and resources in a way that continues to have destructive impacts on the planet. 
Economic and social progress over the last century has been accompanied by environmental degradation that is endangering the very systems on which our future development — indeed, our very survival — depends. 
A few facts and figures:
  • Each year, an estimated one third of all food produced – equivalent to 1.3 billion tonnes worth around $1 trillion – ends up rotting in the bins of consumers and retailers, or spoiling due to poor transportation and harvesting practices.
  • If people worldwide switched to energy efficient light bulbs the world would save US$120 billion annually.
  • Should the global population reach 9.6 billion by 2050, the equivalent of almost three planets could be required to provide the natural resources needed to sustain current lifestyles.

The COVID-19 pandemic offers countries an opportunity to build recovery plans that will reverse current trends and change our consumption and production patterns towards a more sustainable future.
Sustainable consumption and production is about doing more and better with less. It is also about decoupling economic growth from environmental degradation, increasing resource efficiency and promoting sustainable lifestyles.
Sustainable consumption and production can also contribute substantially to poverty alleviation and the transition towards low-carbon and green economies.

KATOWICE CITY ACTIVITIES

#Adopt a flowerpot
Since 2018, flower meadows have been sown in Katowice with the participation of residents. In 2020, the action was extended to include nano-meadows, i.e. meadows in a pot. Residents adopt old, unoccupied pots, as well as used, recycled metal pots, donated by the Municipal Greenery Department, and turn them into flowery meadows. In the starter package, the City provides seeds and compost, and encourages residents to use recycled water or rainwater for watering the nano-pots. The use of such water is an element of closed-circuit management, similarly to compost, obtained by the Municipal Utilities Management Company from biodegradable and green waste, discarded by the inhabitants of Katowice.

Every year the City of Katowice and the State Forests organize the "Eco Responsible" Family Forest Picnic, which takes place in the area of the Three Lakes Valley - a part of Katowice Forest Park. During the event numerous informational and educational activities are carried out in the field of environmental protection,  concerning, among others: municipal waste management, low-emission economy, circular economy,. Their aim is to raise citizens' awareness so that they do not abuse environmental resources for consumption purposes. During the Picnic there is also a number of free attractions and competitions, experiments and field games.

Easter Breakfast for the Lonely, as well as Christmas Eve for the Lonely, organized for many years in the International Congress Center, attract thousands of people who, for various reasons in life, are unable to spend the most important holidays for Christians with their loved ones.
Facts: Every year about 2.5 thousand people take part in the events.

As part of plastic reduction, at the end of 2018, The Katowice City Hall recommended that the catering companies, whose services it uses, should eliminate plastic completely at the meetings organized by the City. The office also reduced the purchase of water in plastic bottles to a minimum.
Moreover, selective waste collection is conducted throughout the Office. Containers for collecting used batteries were also situated in the three buildings of the Office.

 

Climate action

Climate action

KATOWICE CITY ACTIVITIES

The city's plan to adapt to climate change was implemented in Katowice. The Municipal Energy Centre was also launched, where you can obtain information on, inter alia, energy saving, the replacement of heating systems and related municipal support programmes. There is also the Policy Council for improving air quality.
In addition, subsidies are granted to low-emission heat sources (in 2019, almost 1.2 thousand heating systems were replaced - an 8.5% increase compared to 2018, and 120 RES installations were mounted for over PLN 700 thousand), the Municipal Police inspect home fires (19.6 thousand inspections in 2011-2019), and as part of the AWAIR project, 127 air sensors and 154 multimedia screens were installed.

The 'plant a tree' application (Polish: ,wCOP drzewo') is a simple and quick way to indicate the location for new trees in the city. Its name refers to the largest climate conference in the world, the UN Climate Summit (COP24), which took place in 2018 in Katowice.

Since 2018, we have been sowing Flower Meadows (the inhabitants sow them on their own, but also take part in workshops), which has resulted in 20 thousand square metres of flower meadows started from scratch and 50 thousand square metres of wild meadows, which will be mown only once a year, including areas indicated by inhabitants.

Every year, together with the volunteers, we clean up the Districts (Polish: SprzątaMy Dzielnice). In this case, the residents not only indicate the areas, but also vote for the most littered ones, and then we clean them together. Each action ends with an integration barbecue. In 2019, 15 waste containers from 30 hectares of green areas were collected in this way, including 322 bags filled with plastic.

 

 

 

 

Life below water

Life below water

The ocean drives global systems that make the Earth habitable for humankind. Our rainwater, drinking water, weather, climate, coastlines, much of our food, and even the oxygen in the air we breathe, are all ultimately provided and regulated by the sea. 

Careful management of this essential global resource is a key feature of a sustainable future. However, at the current time, there is a continuous deterioration of coastal waters owing to pollution, and ocean acidification is having an adversarial effect on the functioning of ecosystems and biodiversity. This is also negatively impacting small scale fisheries. 

Saving our ocean must remain a priority. Marine biodiversity is critical to the health of people and our planet. Marine protected areas need to be effectively managed and well-resourced and regulations need to be put in place to reduce overfishing, marine pollution and ocean acidification.

 

Life on land

Life on land

Nature is critical to our survival: nature provides us with our oxygen, regulates our weather patterns, pollinates our crops, produces our food, feed and fibre. But it is under increasing stress. Human activity has altered almost 75 per cent of the earth’s surface, squeezing wildlife and nature into an ever-smaller corner of the planet.

Around 1 million animal and plant species are threatened with extinction – many within decades – according to the 2019 Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service. The report called for transformative changes to restore and protect nature. It found that the health of ecosystems on which we and all other species depend is deteriorating more rapidly than ever, affecting  the very foundations of our economies, livelihoods, food security, health and quality of life worldwide. 

Deforestation and desertification – caused by human activities and climate change – pose major challenges to sustainable development and have affected the lives and livelihoods of millions of people. Forests are vitally important for sustaining life on Earth, and play a major role in the fight against climate change. And investing in land restoration is critical for improving livelihoods, reducing vulnerabilities, and reducing risks for the economy.

The health of our planet also plays an important role in the emergence of zoonotic diseases, i.e. diseases that are transmissible between animals and humans. As we continue to encroach on fragile ecosystems, we bring humans into ever-greater contact with wildlife, enabling pathogens in wildlife to spill over to livestock and humans, increasing the risk of disease emergence and amplification.